From The Blog

The Master List of CFPs

Mythgard student and soon-to-be contributor to the next issue of Tolkien Studies, Kris Swank has just sent along some great calls for papers that she’s collected in the hopes we’d share them with other Tolkien scholars.  Without further ado:

  • Women in the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien. edited by Janet Brennan Croft (Mythlore@mythsoc.org) and Leslie Donovan (press@mythsoc.org) Published by the Mythopoeic Press.The place of women in Tolkien’s world is a perennially troublesome topic. On the surface, Tolkien’s major works seem to ignore women or place them on unattainable pedestals, and popular criticism of Tolkien often focuses on this issue. But a closer look can be quite revealing; the deeper one delves into the legendarium and other works, the more prevalent, complex, and powerful the female characters turn out to be. Additionally, male characters often exhibit and are valued for what might be seen as feminine characteristics, and characters who balance feminine and masculine traits are held up as ideals. This collection will bring together several classic essays on Tolkien’s portrayal of women and the feminine with new takes on the topic.

    Projected publication date: Spring 2014
    Deadline for abstracts: May 30, 2013
    Deadline for finished papers: September 1, 2013

  • 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 8-11, 2014.Proposals for Sponsored and Special Sessions—including sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, poster sessions, workshops, demonstrations, and performances—are due on June 1. The Call for Papers for the following year’s Congress, which lists the Sponsored and Special Sessions approved by the Congress Committee, is available on the Congress website in July. You may send a paper proposal to the contact person listed in the Call for Papers for a Sponsored or Special Session OR submit a proposal directly to the Congress Committee to be considered for inclusion in a General Session. Sponsored and Special Sessions may be closing or closed at any point along the timeline to the September 15.

    For more information:  http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html

  • 28th International Conference on Medievalism, “Medievalism: Its Centers and Margins,” St. Norbert College, De Pere, Wisconsin, October 17-19, 2013. Proposal Deadline: July 1, 2013.For more information: http://www.medievalism.net/conferences.html
  • Humour in and around the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien.Volume to be published by Walking Tree Publishers in 2014. Submit an abstract proposal (200-300 words) by August 31, 2013. Upon acceptance, full essays are due by March 1, 2014.

    For more information: http://www.walking-tree.org/callForPapers.php?call=tolkien_and_humour

  • 20th International Medieval Congress, Leeds, U.K., 7-10 July 2014.Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a specific special thematic strand which – for 2014 – is ‘Empire’. Paper proposals must be submitted by 31 August 2013; session proposals must be submitted by 30 September 2013. Hard copies of the proposal forms are available on request after 16 July 2013.

    For more information: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2014_call.html

  • Baptism of Fire: The Birth of Modern British Fantasy in World War I. edited by Janet Brennan Croft (Mythlore@mythsoc.org). Published by the Mythopoeic PressIn Great Britain, the post-World War I years saw a flowering of fantasy written by authors who had lived through its horrors. Tom Shippey observed in Tolkien: Author of the Century that the originators of what we would consider the “late twentieth-century fantastic mode” were in many cases “traumatized authors” who had survived combat and other experiences of the war. Janet Croft, in War and the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien, notes psychiatrist W.H.R. Rivers’s observations that his Great War patients processed their experiences through both dreams and writing. This essay collection will examine the fantasy fiction, poetry, and potentially art of authors affected in one way or another by the Great War and its lasting legacy

    Some authors we may consider are: J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, E.R. Eddison, Kenneth Grahame, A.A. Milne, Sylvia Townsend Warner, Mervyn Peake, James Stephens, David Jones, G.K. Chesterton, Rudyard Kipling; see http://www.firstworldwar.com/poetsandprose/index.htm for more possibilities.

    Projected publication date: Fall 2014
    Deadline for abstracts: September 1, 2013
    Deadline for finished papers: April 1, 2014

Thanks, Kris!

Tags: